2018-04Thematic Section
Cryonics: Technological Fictionalization of Death

Abstract

The article focuses on a change in the understanding of death. Transhumanism is here understood as a reaction to the technicization of culture. One of the areas which are declared to be transcended by technology is human mortality. Analysis of such a change is conducted to show that one does not need a working technology that abolishes death, but that the change could be cultural and have significant impact on human life. This process of transcending death with the usage of technology is understood as a fictionalization of death. The philosophical and cultural outcomes are analyzed for human existence.

Keywords

transhumanism, death, immortality, cryonics

How to cite

Ilnicki, Rafał. “Cryonics: Technological Fictionalization of Death.” Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 2, no. 4(6) (2018): 36–45. https://doi.org/10.26319/6915.

Author

Rafał Ilnicki
Institute of Cultural Studies, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań

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