Call for Papers

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Volume 4: no. 3 (13)/2020 Relations [Extended Deadline – May 31st, 2020]

This issue of our journal will be devoted to the category of relation.

“Relation” is a term used in a wide spectrum of trends in and domains of philosophy, both historical and modern. One could easily find it in ontology (what kind of beings are relations? What are relations between beings?), in classical logic (what formal relation between A and B gives one the truth?), in epistemology (what relation between subject and object gives one knowledge?) as well as in ethics (which kind of our actions, acting upon others, are good or morally desirable?). It is in the heart of a persisting question concerning the relation between mind and body, as well as in the classical definition of truth that defines it as the relation of adequacy between thought and reality.

 Particular philosophical investigations involve diverse “relation issues.” For example, in perhaps the most famous representative dispute about causality, it was considered as the accidental end of empirical relation between beings (Hume). For others, it is the a priori category conditioning all objects of knowledge (Kant). Some poststructuralist doctrines take relations as being-in-itself, and at the same time dethrone substance and consider the latter as of a second, derivative order. In phenomenology one can find research that concerns the relations of human beings to the world or the internal structure of relations of consciousness. In psychoanalysis – and it is the same for Bergson in this matter – the relation between the present and the past is of the fundamental (if not foundational) importance. We encounter the problem of relation whenever the transcendence and immanence problem is raised, whenever the question about the other is asked. The list of the philosophical areas where “the question of relation” is raised (either explicite or implicite) is probably inexhaustible.

To get closer to completing this history (or a better filled out conceptual map) one should also take into consideration philosophy of culture and the role relations play in the contemporary world. It should be noted that modern technological inventions (in such areas as communication, transport, architecture – to mention the most evident examples) together with the global mode of existence, are shaping the way we constitute thoughts, imagine and experience the relations we have with others, with values, with time and space, with mind and body, with our own subjectivity and with culture itself. So the very question of relations appears deeply rooted in the moment of culture and therefore relations are themselves in the strict relation with philosophy of culture. These are the topics we would like to address in this issue.

Extended Deadline: Papers can be submitted by May 31st, 2020 to: eidos.ed@uw.edu.pl

They have to be previously unpublished and they cannot be under consideration for publication elsewhere. They should be prepared for a double-blind review process.

Please, make sure that your paper complies with our submission standards which are posted here.

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Volume 4: no. 4 (14)/2020 Methods of Philosophy of Culture

This issue of our journal will be devoted specifically to the methodological considerations of the current status of philosophy of culture, its relation to other philosophical disciplines as well as to the humanities in general. But above all, we wish to pose the question about methods and perspectives which seem to be the most adequate (if this adjective has not lost its whole relevance) and comprehensive in our efforts of understanding culture.

Culture, as can be seen from the philosophical perspective, is not only the realm of objectified meanings, but its very notion indicates also different modes of dynamic apprehension and recognition of these meanings, as well as their denial, resistance or misrecognition. In other words, to the “essence” of culture belongs a fundamental contradiction between what is objectively posited (facticity) and the processes of self-questioning, the reflective movement beyond all factual determinations. One can say that this contradiction can be expressed by a whole series of unsurpassable tensions between facts and a possible a priori, objective determinations and the ever-present space of indeterminacy, alienation and recognition (and self-recognition), facts and values, the human and the inhuman, the real and the imaginary, cultural arche and telos, etc. It seems that all these tensions become more and more visible in contemporary culture marked by an unprecedented level of complexity and dynamics; by a “liquid” or even aporetic character.

From this perspective, it is difficult not to underestimate the role of philosophy of culture. And yet, it is just as difficult to correctly identify this role. Should it be a kind of reflective synopsis of all positive sciences concerning human reality? A kind of philosophical foundation for cultural studies/humanities (as there is a philosophy of natural sciences)? Or, quite on the contrary, should it be a relentless and normative effort of going beyond all factual determinations, a movement toward the indeterminable and unknown, but still somehow experienceable? What are/should be the distinctive methodological features of philosophy of culture? Are the philosophical currents traditionally associated with philosophy of culture (e.g. the neo-Kantian critical philosophy, phenomenology, hermeneutics, poststructuralism etc.) still able to fulfill their role? Are there, within contemporary philosophy, any new methodological perspectives which could offer valuable tools for the analysis of contemporary cultural phenomena?

We welcome all insightful papers which will address these and similar questions.

Papers can be submitted by June 30th, 2020 to: eidos.ed@uw.edu.pl

They have to be previously unpublished and they cannot be under consideration for publication elsewhere. They should be prepared for a double-blind review process.

Please, make sure that your paper complies with our submission standards which are posted here.

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General CFP

Apart from Calls for Papers to thematic sections, Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture invites, on a continuous basis, all high-quality papers which address topics relevant for philosophy of culture. Contemporary culture can be characterized as highly complex, dynamic if not aporetic: as a realm of ever changing conceptual and axiological frameworks, and of plural or even competing meanings. In this perspective, what is needed is constantly renewed philosophical reflection, which not only addresses but also interprets and makes sense of different cultural processes. For philosophy of culture itself demands (perhaps, more than ever before) a form of deepened meta-reflection, which confront the problems of its essence, methods, and a role it should play. Therefore, we welcome both: original analyses of contemporary cultural phenomena and methodological considerations on the current status of philosophy of culture and its relations to other philosophical disciplines as well as to the humanities in general.

The essays should be submitted as an e-mail attachment to: eidos.ed@uw.edu.pl.

The essays have to be previously unpublished and they cannot be under consideration for publication elsewhere. They should be prepared for a double-blind review process. Please, make sure that your paper complies with our submission standards which are posted here.

Download PDF