2019-02Thematic Section
The Concept of Violence in the Evolution of Nietzsche’s Thought

Abstract:

The aim of this paper is to present the idea of violence in Nietzsche’s work, seen as a basic principle that organizes and unites different elements of his philosophy. Violence is one of its crucial categories, which he exploits in his descriptions and analyses of metaphysical, historical and social-cultural reality. In what follows, I shall examine different meanings and renditions of violence in Nietzsche, both in their negative as well as positive aspects. I shall start from an attempt to locate Nietzsche’s understanding of violence within the Western philosophical tradition. Then, I will discuss it in the light of the evolution of Nietzsche’s work. By analyzing the positive and constructive meaning of violence, I shall be able to conclude the essay by emphasizing that in Nietzsche’s political project violence acquires a spiritual and sublime nature.

Keywords:

violence, cruelty, conflict, struggle, antagonism, domination, mastery

How to cite:

Pieniążek, Paweł. “The Concept of Violence in the Evolution of Nietzsche’s Thought.” Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 3, no. 2(8) (2019): 13–25. https://doi.org/10.14394/eidos.jpc.2019.0014.

Author:

Paweł Pieniążek
Institute of Philosophy, University of Lodz
3/5 Lindleya St., 91-131 Łódź, Poland
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5258-7005
pawel.pieniazek@filozof.uni.lodz.pl

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